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Civivi Keen Nadder Review

Civivi Keen Nadder Black C2021A
Civivi Keen Nadder Black C2021A

The first time I saw the Civivi Keen Nadder I knew I had to get my hands on one. The first images I saw of the Keen Nadder were from the Civivi OneDrive share they provide to dealers. However, my interest wasn’t as a knife dealer. It had my attention on a personal level. It was just one of those knives.. As soon as I saw it, I knew it was one I was going to want for my own pocket.

Once they were available on the Civivi ordering portal I made sure I didn’t waste any time. I got my order placed right away.

First Impressions

Upon arrival, I first opened the Civivi Keen Nadder C2021A; that’s the black model. The first impressions of this knife were in no way disappointing. The knife has a good solid feel and heft to it. The modified tanto style blade is unique and has an interesting cool factor. The handle is made from G10. However, it has a coarse textured feel to it that I have not seen on other knives. The blade has a nice matte stonewashed finish that is not reflective. Due to its narrow handle height, it’s an impressive knife, because you really have a pocket knife with a larger blade, but it is still able to keep a slender profile and not take up much pocket real estate. This is by far one of my favorite knives in recent times. Those are my first impressions!

Specs

The overall length of this knife is 8.2” inches. The handle is made from a coarse textured black G10 or from micarta depending on the model you are interested in. The handle length is 4.75” inches. The handle thickness is .5” inches. The handle height is .75” inches. The blade length by itself is 3.48” inches. The blade on this knife is made from Bohler N690 steel and is a bit thicker than most coming in at .15” inches; being thicker tends to be more common with tanto style blades. Starting with a thicker stalk helps keep the nose of the tanto rigid preventing tip breaks and similar failures. The blade is a gray stonewashed finish.

Blade

The Keen Nadder has what I suppose we would call a modified tanto style blade. Tanto style blades are typically known for their strength, high points, and piercing abilities. From the back of the blade, the flat edge is typically straight which leads to the front tip of the blade. That front tip generally angles upwards at roughly a 45 degree angle. The tip also has a straight edge. On the Civivi Keen Nadder, the edges of the blade are not straight. The longer flat edge is concave while the tip of the tanto blade is convex. This truly gives the Keen Nadder a very different look which in my opinion is great! One last thing I would like to point out is the jimping on this knife is really well done. It’s a fat, thick, and chunky jimping that no thumb can miss. The size of your hand will not matter.

Side note on sharpening: I’ve heard some people say because of this modified tanto blade shape it would make sharpening more difficult. Well, I’m here to say I’ve carried the Keen Nadder now for a couple of months. I’ve sharpened this knife a few times. I have not had any issues what-so-ever. I believe that train of thought is faulty and debunked.

Handle

At the time of writing this review, there are three models or versions of the Civivi Keen Nadder. They all have the same blades and hardware. The only difference is the handle colors and materials. The black version has chunky course G10 handles, while the other two versions sport an olive green and brown micarta handle scales. The texture on the olive green and brown versions are typical of what you would find on other Civivi knives and is nowhere near as coarse as the black model.

Pocketclip

I always make a point to talk about the pocket clip on every single knife I review. Civivi never fails! The Keen Nadder just like every other pocket knife I’ve come across by Civivi does indeed feature the all mighty deep carry pocket clip. In my opinion, if a pocketknife does not have a deep carry pocket clip, the designer did it wrong. Period.

Deployment

Deployment on the Keen Nadder is achieved by two methods, flipper and thumb studs. I tend to always use the flipper as most of my knives offer that feature and I subconsciously am trained to do so. However, this knife also opens effectively and efficiently via the thumbstuds. I believe when using the thumb studs it takes a bit more effort to open the blade than on other knives making it seem a bit like an afterthought almost. However, since I primarily use the flipper tab on the back of the knife this in no way has a negative impact for me or on my review. If you prefer to open a knife using the thumb studs that may prove to be a useful bit of information for you.

Lockup

The lockup on this knife is very rigid and has a satisfying ::chunk:: once the liner lock is engaged. There is no movement or wiggling in any manner at or near the blade pivot. Once this blade is open there is no chance of the blade accidentally closing. The liner lock is extremely secure.

Fit and Finish

When I close this knife and look at the blade and how it closes, the blade is perfectly centered between the handles. This knife operates smoothly and cleanly with precision every single time. In general, Civivi does a good job on most of their pocket knives in these terms. All faces, sides, and edges (minus the blade) of this knife including the pocket clip have rounded edges. To the eye, nothing looks out of place. And by feel, everything seem to be right where you would want it.

Final Thoughts

The Civivi Keen Nadder is a great looking, extremely functional pocket knife, that is very budget friendly. I own a lot of pocket knives. Right from the get-go this knife caught my attention. And now, this is one of my favorite knives that I carry more days than not. This is my go to EDC!  If you are looking for a reliable pocket knife with a tanto style blade this is a very solid choice.

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Civivi Elementum Rosewood C907C

Civivi Elementum Rosewood C907C
Civivi Elementum Rosewood C907C

Recently we tried restocking the Civivi Elementum C907C. This model features a Rosewood handle and satin D2 blade, pictured on this page.

We noticed we could no longer find this knife on the Civivi restock inventory website. So, we sent an email for further inquiry. We were informed by a member of the Civivi team that they have not yet determined if the Elementum C907C will be discontinued.

Unfortunately, it sounds to us like this model of the Elementum might just be on the chopping block. This is a great looking knife that always sold well. We are surprised this model may be a short timer and eventually be discontinued. We certainly hope there is a change of heart! We would love to see it available again for restock in the very near future!

If you are trying to find this particular model you will likely have to scour the internet to find a new one. We wish you luck!

If we receive any further updates about the Civivi Elementum C907C we will be sure to keep everyone updated. We will post on our website and share the news via our social media outlets to let everyone know of its status.

We do have many other models of the Elementum. Please check them out here.

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Civivi Odium – Podcast S20E02

Civivi Odium C2010E
Civivi Odium C2010E

Hello everyone! Ryan from ScoutEDC. Today on the podcast we are going to talk about the Civivi Odium. Here in front of me I have version C2010E and that is the version with black handle and black blade. This looks really nice. I would almost say this was all blacked out — but not quite — because the liners are not black and the pivot is not black. Everything else is. Alright, let’s dig in!

First Impressions

This is a really nice looking knife! I very much like this knife. It looks amazing. The only thing I would say, first impressions, is this is on the small side. I’m not saying that as a negative thing. It’s just a smaller knife. With that said, it’s very nice looking. I like this knife a lot. Small knives serve their purposes! There are times when I’m wearing slacks that I might not want to carry my Spyderco Para Military 2 that’s a little too much knife for dress pants. So, I will tend to lean toward my Civivi Exarch that is a bit more pencil thin. I could also see carrying this, the Civivi Odium. This is a nice knife. Boy, this thing is sharp! First impression I very much like this. The Civivi Odium comes in many different flavors. There is this version the C2010E black blade and black handle. They also have a version with black handle with satin stainless steel looking blade and then they also have different colored handles where they have orange and blue, and I don’t know what other colors, they might have more colors than that.

We currently carry four and they all look very nice. All with G10 handle scales and various colors. These are very impressive nice looking little knives.

I could see, some of us have bug-out bags and things, you might not necessarily want your pocketknife to be super stealthy. In your bug-out bag, it’s an emergency, maybe you want to get the pocketknife that has a bright orange handle on it that way in an emergency situations if you drop your knife you might be able to find that knife a lot easier if you dropped it on the ground or in the woods or what have you in the dark. There are certain situations and circumstances that we all might find ourselves in. For day to day I think having a brightly colored pocketknife isn’t necessarily the way to go. Although, some of us add that flare and add that character. Yeah, this is a nice looking knife.

Specs

So, let’s get started on the specs. It’s not a big knife. The overall length is 6.19 inches, the blade length is 2.65 inches, and the handle length is 3.45 inches. In the hand, that is not a very large handle. Infact, I have this knife in my hand right now. I can wrap three of my first fingers, my index finger, middle finger, and ring finger around the handle. My little finger does not wrap around the backside of the handle. However, the way that they have tapered and shaped the butt of this pocket knife, it really just kinda melts into your hand. The fact that it has a good inch of jimping on top back spine of the blade you can really lock up on this knife and get a good grip even though you don’t have all four fingers on the handle. The handle, the back butt of the handle, it contours to the shape of the palm of your hand. At least for me with larger hands this although is a small knife it really works and is really comfortable. I very much like this. Spec-wise this is not a big knife. It weighs in at two and a half ounces, 2.5 ounces.. very light!

Blade

So, the Blade on this guy is a black stonewash finish. It’s a plain blade. I don’t think they have a serrated version of the Odium, but I would really like to see one. With the size of this blade and the finger choil and.. you know what I realize now, that — no kidding — I’m learning as i’m going here. You can actually put your first finger, your index finger, on the finger choil of the blade itself, and then your middle finger rest on the finger spot of the handle and you can get all four fingers, a full grip on this knife. No kidding, for this size knife, that is pretty impressive. Now, I will say, that seems a little dicey to me. But, that puts your index finger awfully close to the blade. And, although you can get a real nice solid grip on that I see potential for cutting yourself. It’s just too close for comfort, but in a pinch you can get all four fingers wrapped around this knife and get an extremly good grip. That’s pretty interesting, I don’t know how that didn’t stand out to me prior to making this.

Handle

The handle, like I mentioned before, this is the blacked version if you will. Although, technically not because the liners and the pivot are steel in color. The scales are G10 and the texturing looks very nice. I do however notice some variations from Odium to Odium. It seems some have a nicer more textured look and some look a bit more flat and smooth. This would certainly be a production/manufacturing issue. Although the handle does not provide much in the way of texture or added grip slippage, the handle certainly has visual appeal.

Pocketclip

So, the pocket clip! I’m always big on talking about pocket clips. I really believe if a pocketknife has a pocket clip it should be a deep carry pocket clip. I don’t understand why anyone wants to clip their knife to their pocket and have the top half-inch or inch hanging out of their pocket. I personally don’t like to advertise the fact that I am carrying a pocketknife. Sure, someone may see that clip on your pocket, it could be a pen, a flashlight, it could be whatever.. anything. If your pocketknife isn’t sticking out of your pocket no one can be certain that you are actually carrying a pocketknife. I like to leave it up to people’s imaginations. I don’t want to carry a pocket knife and put it on display for everyone. This pocketknife has a deep carry pocket clip as do all of the Civivi Odium versions.

Deployment

This has a thumb hole on it and I am able to open it with the thumb hole. I am able to do that in a controlled fashion open the blade out. I do have larger hands and this is a smaller knife this is a bit difficult for me to do. However, if you had smaller hands this would not be an issue at all, it would be very easy for you to do. With that said, there still is a flipping tab on the back of this pocketknife so I can open this no problem. This has a beautiful action to it; the blade flies open. This is not an assisted opening knife. You can always tell if a knife is assisted. When you are closing the blade you will notice a tension wanting to keep the knife open.

Lockup

The lockup on this Odium is very rigid. There is no movement at the rear of the blade near the pivot. Once this blade opens the liner lock will securely hold the blade open with no chance of closing.

Fit and Finish

When I close this knife and look at the blade and how it closes, the blade is perfectly centered between the handles. One some pocketknives you might notice that the blade is closer to the inside of one of the handles. Civivi does a very nice job on most of their pocketknives. I think every Civivi pocketknife I’ve come across is very well centered. My over all impression of this knife is very good. It uses solid good looking materials that won’t let you down.

Final Thoughts

The Civivi Odium is not an expensive knife. It’s very budget friendly. This is a great looking, small, yet functional, every day carry pocketknife.

Thank you for listening. As always we greatly appreciate it when you follow and share out content. We really appreciate it when you let other people know about who we are and what we do. Sharing our content and website really helps us out a lot and we appreciate it.

Thank you again again! Please be good, take care, stay safe, and we will see you in the next one!

Please visit our website and interact with us on social media:
Website: https://scoutedc.com
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Music in this podcast provided courtesy of YB Muzik:
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We Knife Banter – Podcast S20E01

We Knife Banter
We Knife Banter

The We Knife Banter is a simple, understated knife, that has been crafted with quality materials, detail, and care. If you are looking for your next pocketknife this is worth a gander. There is an old expression that less is more. If you were to apply that old adage to the pocket knife world this knife is what you would be looking for.

On this audio podcast episode we are going to talk about the Banter. If you are not familiar with the Banter (or, even if you are) take a listen and find out what we have to say. Spolier alert: The We Knife Company makes a great number of high quality knives. This also holds true for the Banter. When it comes to decision making, there are some things you just can’t go wrong with. This pocketknife will be one of them. Of course, that is only our opinion. Please take a listen to the podcast and let us know what you think!

Please visit our website and interact with us on social media:
Website: https://scoutedc.com
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Instagram: http://instagram.scoutedc.com
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Spotify: http://spotify.scoutedc.com

Music in this podcast provided courtesy of YB Muzik:
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/ybmuzik
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ybmuzikofficial

The We Knife Banter: Make one your own!

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ScoutEDC Podcast Introduction

Welcome to the introduction of the ScoutEDC Podcast. This is where we will talk pocketknives and EDC gear. We will likely be a bit more long winded in these audio podcasts than in our Youtube videos. This is only the intro. We are looking forward to reviewing knives, creating content, and sharing more with you soon. If you have any thoughts or suggestions for future podcasts, please let us know. You can always get a hold of us via our contact page. We would love to hear from you. As always, thanks for stopping by, take care, and we’ll be seeing you around. #BePrepared

Please visit our website and interact with us on social media:
Website: https://scoutedc.com
Youtube: http://youtube.scoutedc.com
Facebook: http://facebook.scoutedc.com
Twitter: http://twitter.scoutedc.com
Pinterest: http://pinterest.scoutedc.com
Instagram: http://instagram.scoutedc.com
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We Knife Banter Review

Hello everyone. Today, we are going to take a look at the We Knife Banter. We have the black version and we also have the blue version as well. First impression, these are very nice knives. The blue version is model 2004A and the black version is model 2004B.

The Banter at first glance

I notice the We Knife Banter tends to be a tad bit small in my hand. However, I do have fairly large hands. Although slightly on the small side for my liking, overall, I still very much like this knife. The Banter is rather understated and plain in terms of design. That however should not over look the fact the We the the We Knife Company created this knife using quality materials. Plain? Yes. Simple? Yes. Performance? Yes. This is a well crafted knife. You will get many years of use from this knife unless you absolutely merciless and beat the hell out of your pocket knives.

Overview

The Banter weighs in at 2.86 ounces. The over all length when opened from blade tip to handle butt is 6.5″ inches. The 2.9″ inch blade features high quality spear point CPM-S35VN blade steel and a proper deep carry pocket clip. Both the black and blue Banter models have stone washed blades. One blade is satin and the other black given the colors of the knives. The Banter has a nice middle of the road, happy-medium, textured G-10 handle scales. Its just the right amount of grippiness.

Blade deployment

The deployment on these knives are crisp. The blade opens on caged ceramic ball bearings and flips out effortlessly. I would also say, the Banter has a good fidget factor. If you like flipping your pocket knives open and fiddling with that action there really is a good fidgeting factor to this knife. And, I could see that getting a little better with time. I would like to point out this is not an assisted opening knife. It does however open and close with ease. I don’t like having to fight a blade closed when I’m done using my knife. A lot of times, when you’re using your pocket knife, you’re using it with one hand. To be able to easily close your knife with one hand after finishing a task is a good thing in my book.

The lockup

The lock up on the Banter pocket knife is very rigid. There’s no play. I really like the frame lock on the Banter. I think of jimping as being on the back spine of the knife blade. However, there is a nice larger notched feature that is jimping-like on the Banter’s liner lock. You can really feel where that release is tactically without visually looking for it. This pocket liner does not create a hot spot that might bother you if you were using your knife for a longer task like others I’ve met over the years.

Pocket clip

The pocket clip is on point! I will always point out a knife with a deep carry pocket clip. I absolutely believe that a pocket knife, if it has a clip, it should be a deep carry pocket clip. That’s the way it should be done, period. I don’t like to carry a pocket knife and have the top half inch or inch of my knife hanging out of my pocket. I’ve actually caught my knife on things in the past and had it fall out of my pocket. That certainly is not a good look, not to mention, you can ding, scratch, and damage your trusty pocket knife. Having your knife entirely inside your pocket (hello deep pocket carry clip) is the only and best way to do it in my opinion.

Fit and finish

The fit and finish of this knife is nice. Everything fits together nicely and has good fine tolerances. The blade falls center over top of the standoff between the handles. The edges have been rounded on all the steel and G-10 parts of this knife including the spine of the knife and pocket clip. There are no unexpected sharp edges. It looks good to the eye and is nice and smooth to the touch.

Conclusion

In conclusion, I’d say the We Knife Banter is a great knife. It has premium materials and ultimately is a good bang for the buck. This is a solid knife that can compete with the test of time. You should get a great many years of use out of this pocket knife. Whether opening boxes in the office or putting it to use while camping for those lighter duty jobs, the Banter is rugged enough to get the job done. This is a truly useful everyday carry pocket knife. It can make your day a little easier and really truly stand the test of time. Check it out and give it a shot. Let us know what you think about it.

There it is! That was the We Knife Banter. Thank you for watching. If you liked this video please subscribe and click the bell. We look forward to doing this again in another video, with a different knife. As always take care, and we will see you in the next one.

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Introduction

Introduction: Hello! Welcome to the ScoutEDC Youtube Channel. On this channel we are going to primarily talk about pocket knives and other EDC gear.

In this introduction we want to share the basics, so you understand who we are. ScoutEDC is a family owned business located in Orlando, Florida. We love knives and interacting with other people that do as well. Shoot us a message. Ask us questions. Suggest products you would like to see us carry. We want to hear from you and look forward to engaging with you. We’re not a stuffy soulless business. We have heart. We want to carry products you like and will enjoy for years to come. Our aim is to always provide the best customer service in the industry and do our best to impress anyone that comes in contact with us. That is how we want to be known, remembered, and earn your business.

If you are not familiar with the term EDC, EDC is an acronym and it stands for Every Day Carry. To EDC something, means that you, well, you carry it every day. And, it’s generally because it adds value to your day. It makes your life a little bit better. So, whether it’s a pocket knife, a pen, a flashlight, maybe it’s a bottle opener, it’s 2020… You might need a drink. I don’t know. I digress. However, those are the things we’re going to talk about: pocket knives and other EDC gear. And, if that’s something that interests you, then we welcome you to the channel, and we certainly would love to have you subscribe.

We look forward to creating and sharing more videos and content with you and with that said, thank you for stopping by.

Take care and we will see you in the next one!

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How to Care for Your Pocket Knife

Pocket Knife Care

Taking care of your pocket knife isn’t rocket science. In reality, it’s mostly common sense. There are 4 points to keep in mind to ensure your pocket knife is always primed and ready for use.

Keep your knife dry

Most knife blades are made out of some variety of steel. In addition to the the blade itself, other parts of your knife may also have hardware that can rust when subjected to moisture. Some steels are more susceptible to rusting, corroding, and discoloring such as different varieties of carbon steel. By keeping your knife stored in a nice dry place, you can ensure rust is never an issue. However, a lot of people work outdoors and may encounter moisture as a part of their job. If your knife is going to be subjected to moisture frequently you will want to research knife steels. Finding a knife that is best suited to the conditions you are going subject it to is a good idea. If you get caught in the rain once in a while, that shouldn’t be a big deal. However, it is always a good idea to thoroughly wipe down your knife to remove all moisture. You should do this as soon as you can. The longevity of your knife should always be of importance and keeping your knife dry is one of the best ways to care for your pocket knife.

Keep your knife clean

Cleaning your knife frequently is a must! If for no other reason than the simple standpoint of cleanliness. Should you for some reason need to use your knife on a food item it’s good to know your knife is properly and regularly cleaned. From another perspective, cleaning your knife and ensuring it is free from debris helps it function at its best. I am not a big fan of chemically abrasive cleaning options, such as acetone or paint thinner. I prefer using a rubbing alcohol or an antibacterial kitchen dish soap and microfiber cloth to clean my blade. For all other parts of the knife, I use my air compressor to ensure there is not an over abundance of dust, dirt, grime, or pocket lint built up in the handle of my knife. For a more detailed cleaning, I will occasionally completely take my knife apart, giving attention to all parts, pieces, hardware, and how everything fits together. Remember, some knives are under tension from springs. Please, always use caution.

Keep your knife lubricated

Lubricating your knife serves two very important purposes. It provides a moisture barrier ensuring your knife blade and hardware does not rust. Also, lubricating will ensure your pocket knife opens and closes smoothly and effortlessly. It is very important you remember to lubricate your knife after a thorough cleaning and even between cleanings on occasion. A thin film of lubricant is all it takes to ensure your knife stays in tip top operational shape. Also, be sure to not over lubricate. Over lubricating can and will attract excessive dust, dirt, and with the passing of time may potentially make your pocket knife tougher to open having the opposite of the intended effect.

Keep your knife sharp

There is absolutely no reason to carry a dull knife. When you use a dull blade it requires you to use more force to cut, which increases the odds the knife may slip from your hand or cutting position. A sharp knife will more readily bite into the object you are cutting, and provide a better cut or slice with very little effort. With so many various knives and steel types you may need to sharpen you knife frequently or infrequently. It truly depends on the steel quality of your particular pocket knife. If you buy a knife with a high quality steel you will generally sharpen you knife far less frequently. There are a great many number of sharpeners out there. One thing I do know for sure, is using a cheap dollar store knife sharpener would be better than a dull knife stuck in your hand!

Please keep these four points in mind when you care for your pocket knife.